A group of scientists managed to grow monkeys immune to HIV

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is rightly considered the "plague of the XXI century". Despite significant advances in many areas of medicine and improve the quality of life in the fight against this insidious virus humanity is losing. In this case, the idea of ​​creating a vaccine does not leave the minds of researchers from around the world. And according to an article published in the journal Nature, a group of molecular biologists succeeded thanks to the recently discovered antibodies induce a powerful immune response against strains of HIV in the body of monkeys.

A group of scientists managed to grow monkeys immune to HIV

Two years ago, the researchers, led by Michael Nussentsvaygom of Rockefeller University in New York discovered an antibody 3BNC117, which is able to inhibit the proliferation of several species of the human immunodeficiency virus, and even mark them for destruction by the immune system. 3BNC117 antibody was isolated from the body of HIV-infected patients whose immune system is very well fought with viral infection. In addition, the researchers conducted a series of clinical tests on patients with HIV. During experiments 3BNC117 molecules are not allowed to propagate virus for 2 months after stopping antiretrovirals.

In addition, there is another antibody that can be used for the acquisition of immunity to HIV - 10-1074. Michael Nussentsvayga team decided to try to combine these two substances to make a vaccine against HIV. The subsequent series of tests was carried out on monkeys: 12 macaques were infected with SHIV (simian species of HIV), and after 3 days in their circulation began to introduce high doses 3BNC117 and 10-1074. Antibodies continued to suppress the virus for six months while their molecules present in the bloodstream. The virus began to multiply again. It would seem that scientists were able to create another medicine so-called maintenance therapy, but in the next 1, 5 years there was something incredible. In 9 out of 12 monkeys developed a strong immune response to the virus, and the level of infection in the body has fallen sharply, and again did not increase, despite the fact that a person's next of kin had not received antiretroviral therapy. As the researchers say, such a method of HIV may also be applicable to the people, and now experts are aimed at trying to figure out, work whether the same method for macaques became infected with HIV during the 6 weeks prior to treatment, because approximately the time a person passes between infection and detection of infection. As Michael said Nussentsvayg,

"Our therapy produces a powerful immune response against HIV and allows the body to control the infection. It works on much the same principles as cancer immunotherapy using similar mechanisms existing in the immune system of humans and apes. "