The virus has stopped the development of brain tumors

There are tumors that are, unfortunately, very difficult to treat, so they require a different approach. One of the options are modified viruses that do not cause harm to the person, but the effect on the tumor. It is this and managed to make the researchers at Duke University, who were able to overcome one of the most aggressive tumors - glioblastoma.

The virus has stopped the development of brain tumors

Glioblastoma - this is one of the most common brain tumors are extremely difficult to treat. According to statistics, the majority of patients do not survive more than 20 months after diagnosis. Furthermore, glioblastoma recurs very frequently, appearing even after seemingly positive outcome of the treatment. In the course of attending all: chemotherapy, radiation therapy and even surgery in cases where this is possible.

To solve the difficult task of scientists decided to use a modified version of the polio virus. The fact that the virus is the pathway to the nerve tissue, and in particular, to a protein CD155. Glioblastoma produces this protein is abundant, but it is impossible to use a version of the pathogenic and inhuman. To do this, experts have deduced version of poliovirus, which was called PVSRIPO. It effectively detects and CD155 contributes to the destruction of cancer cells without affecting healthy ones. Moreover, PVSRIPO stimulates immune system activity, urging her to fight the disease. In a series of experiments was selected 61 patients with recurrent (ie, the one that returned after treatment) form of glioblastoma. 21% of patients receiving therapy PVSRIPO, could survive more than 3 years. In another control group not receiving treatment for more than 3 years lived only 4% of patients. In this case, one of those who receive treatment are still alive 2 patients. And the experiment, by the way, lasts for 6 years. The researchers now plan to continue the study of the drug, as well as find out how it will be effective in combination with other anti-cancer therapy.